Friday, May 31, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS >> 05-31-13


ANNOUNCEMENTS

THE COMBAT AIRLIFTER CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT will take ads by phone from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday 982-9421, or you may mail your ad to 404 Graham Rd., Jacksonville, Ark. 72078. You may also e-mail them to combatairlifterclassifieds@arkansasleader.com Deadline to advertise in Friday's issue is 5 p.m. Tuesday.


HELP WANTED

DRIVERS: MAKE $63,000 year more, $2,500 Driver Referral Bonus & $1,200 Orientation Completion Bonus! CDL-A OTR experience required. Call now: 1-888-993-0972.

CDL-A TRUCK driver O/Os. Home nearly every day! Excellent pay! $1.07/mile. Mainstream Transportation. Call today! 866-441-0169.


YARD SALES

MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE sale, 6/1, 7 am-noon, 894 Jamestown Cir., Jax. (Collenwood subv.)

HUGE MULTI-FAMILY yard sale, 5/31 & 6/1, 14 Country Village Cir., Cabot. Fishing & camping equipment, toys, tools, children & adult clothing, lights, furniture & many extras.

YARD SALE, 6/1, 8 am-? 226 Weathering Cir., Austin. Girl's clothes 3 mos.-4T, toys, household items, miscellaneous, more.

GARAGE SALE, 6/1, 8 am-2 pm, 12 Glendale Dr., Cabot.

2-FAMILY YARD sale, 6/1, 7 am, 109 Lexington Ct., Jax. 2 storage buildings.

YARD SALE, 5/31 & 6/1, 8 am-2 pm, 616 Chaucer Ct., Stonewall, Jax. Lots of bargains.

MULTI-FAMILY MOVING sale, 6/1, 7 am-2 pm, 75 Rosebud Cir., Cabot. Furniture, camping gear, box springs, TV in the box, tons of scrapbooking stuff!


HORSES

HORSES: LUCKY Acres Boarding Stable, TLC for your horse, box stalls and paddocks, clean pastures, indoor and outdoor arenas, riding instruction and training program. Dressage our specialty. (501) 988-2458.


PETS

3 YR. old Catahoula/Golden Retriever mix & 4 yr. old Beagle/Shepherd mix, free. (616) 485-0019.


AUTOS/ACCESSORIES

2010 MUSTANG Convertible, torch red, black top, V-6, 5-spd. automatic, 37,000 miles, like new condition with excellent miles per gallon & fun to drive. Price reduced to $17,500. (501) 231-6184.

ATV TIRES, Dunlop, 2 at size 25x10-12, & 2 at size 25x8-12, used but good amount of tread remains, $40 for all. (501) 843-2187.

GREAT BUY!! 2004 Grand Marquis, good mileage, clean interior, $2,850 obo. Don't miss out! (501) 241-1883 or (501) 658-3224.

2012 CHEVROLET Camaro wheels, 2-20x8, 2-20x9, only 2,400 miles, great condition, $550 obo. (501) 743-5385, leave msg.

2008 HONDA CR-V LX 4-door, black, 64,000 miles, excellent condition, $11,800. (501) 554-3508.

1998 TOYOTA Rav4, tinted windows, cold A/C, good tires, black, 5-spd., CD, aux. hookup, 4WD, 152,000 miles, runs well, $3,300 obo. Call/text (501) 410-2752.

1968 CHEVY C10 project truck, SWB/fleet side, metal bed, lg. back window, comes w/extra hood, doors, rocker panels, cab corners, grill, etc. No motor or trans., $1,650 obo. (501) 773-7741.

2003 FORD F150 King Ranch, runs but will need a new 5.4L, $7,300. (501) 773-7741.


RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

2008 HONDA CBR600RR, 8,700 miles, $7,000 obo. (918) 978-5012.

2005 WEEKEND Warrior Lite travel trailer, 24', sleeps 6, Onan generator, outdoor shower, refuel station, heat & air, awning, non-smoker, $10,000. (501) 983-8022.


ITEMS FOR SALE

SCHOOL BOOKS, 50 Essays, 3rd edition by Samuel Cohen, $18; Easy Writer, 4th edition by Andrea A. Lunsford, $25. (501) 786-3803.

COLEMAN CAMP stove & lantern, use or class as antiques, bought new in early '70s, used once, still in orig. box, use liquid fuel, like new, $75 for both. (501) 843-2187.

CRAFTSMAN, HEAVY duty shop vice, 5" jaw width, opens to 9", weight 50 lbs., USA made, excellent condition, $50 cash. (501) 843-2187.

KENMORE WASHER & dryer, work well, $300. (443) 243-7583.

PENTAX OPTIO M30 digital camera, 7.1 mp., 3x optical zoom, lithium ion battery w/2 chargers, USB cable, CD-ROM & case, $90. (918) 649-5164.

ADULT BIKE, $50. (501) 658-5213 after 7 pm.


FURNITURE

VINTAGE PIANO, Jesse French, handsome furniture piece, needs tuning, $50; brown leather couch, Flex-steel, excellent, non-smoking house, $200. 843-7398, Cabot.

TRIPLE DRESSER, matching night stands, real bamboo, brass pulls, vintage, $400 obo. (501) 835-3135.


HOUSES FOR RENT

3 bedroom, 2 bath, approximately 1500 sq. ft., LOCATION! Playful cul-de-sac in Cabot. Large rooms, fenced backyard. Pets extra, appliances. Priced to rent fast at $960 month. Call (215) 264-8728.

3 BEDROOM, 2 bath, living room, den with fireplace, kitchen with stove, refrigerator & dishwasher, laundry area, 2-car garage, fenced backyard, pets considered with nonrefundable pet deposit. Close to air base, Stonewall subdivision, on cul-de-sac. $975 plus deposit. Call (501) 529-7767 or (501) 529-7624.

CLEAN 3 bedroom, 2 bath on Jacksonville cul-de-sac, Stonewall. All appliances & washer/dryer, fireplace, deck, HOA pool & T-court, 2-car garage with openers. $975 month. (805) 402-7424.

FOR LEASE: 1700 sq. ft. home in Westhaven subdivision in Cabot. Very clean, pet free, smoke free home with large backyard. $1,000 deposit (nonrefundable to pet owners), $1,100 per month. Call Tommy @ (501) 680-1246.

FOR RENT: 3/2 house, very nice, 31 Park View, Cabot. $850 month, $550 deposit. Call Richard (870) 329-0019.


HOUSES FOR SALE

VA NO money down, liberal help with buyer's closing costs. 2215 sq. ft. brick house on 5 acres near LRAFB. Price reduced, completely updated. Homebuyer's warranty available. Doug Wilkinson, 982-1517. Call Jack, 804-1616 or Rhonda, 590-6598.

BEAUTIFUL, SPACIOUS 3 BR, 2 1/2 bath, formal dining room, fireplace, storm shelter, close to Beebe schools, vaulted ceilings in LR & master. $175,000. Call (870) 615-9009.

BRIEFS 05-31-13

Vacation Bible School scheduled
Scheduled to take place June 10 - 14, 8:30 - 11:30 a.m. at the TCAC. For more information call 987-6014.

Commissary Survey goes live
From Saturday through Aug. 1, an online survey will be available on www.commissaries.com by clicking on the “take our survey” link or accessing the survey directly at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/DeCA-Shopping-Survey.

19 AW Enlisted Promotion Recognition Ceremony today
The 19th Airlift Wing’s enlisted promotion recognition ceremony is at 3:30 p.m. today at Hangar 1080.

Legal Office closure
The Legal Office will be closed from noon to 2:30 p.m. June 14 for an official function. If you require emergency assistance, please contact the Command Post at 987-1900. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Newcomers orientation event
Newcomers in-processing to the base is held at the Airman and Family Readiness Center Bldg 668 on Wednesdays from 7:45 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Spouses are encouraged to attend. Call 501-987-6801 for an appointment.

19th FSS Change of Command
The 19th Force Support Squadron change-of-command ceremony is scheduled for 2 p.m.  June 7 in Hangar 1080.

Auto Hobby Shop closed June 8
Due to the Cruisin’ at the Rock Car Show being held at the TCAC, the Auto Hobby Shop will be closed June 8.

EFMP Quarterly Movie
Kid-friendly movie presented at the Thomas Community Activity Center Bldg 868 from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday. Drinks and snack will be provided. Call 501-987-6801 for scheduling.

FEATURE >> The Spurling Animal Shelter

By Airman 1st Class Scott Poe
19th Airlift Wing Public Affairs

Fifteen years ago Samson, a Yorkie, found a home in San Antonio, Texas. The home was that of Senior Master Sgt. Melissa Spurling. Seeing Samson, she fell in love. Samson was the first animal adopted by Spurling, driving her devotion and love for animals.

Living in San Antonio, she could not go anywhere without passing a stray cat or dog. She started taking in strays and giving them homes, thus establishing the foundation of The Spurling Animal shelter.

“Once I got Samson, who is 15 years old, I don’t know what it was, but I just knew I loved animals, that’s what started it all, it’s all Sam’s fault,” said Spurling.

There are currently 16 dogs and 35 cats all individually named, and being cared for by Spurling. When she first started rescuing animals, she would find them herself but after she made a name for herself people would call her about strays.

“When I started off, I would just find animals on my own, either on the side of the road or at a gas station… whereever there was an animal in need, I decided to pick it up,” said Spurling. “Once word got out, then people started calling me; they would find a dog and they would be like ‘what can you do with this dog,’” said Spurling.

When Spurling rescues an animal the first thing she does is take it to the vet to get checked out. Sometimes the animal may need immediate attention, because if it is sick it could be passed on to other animals.

“Once I rescue an animal, I take it to my vet for care; spay/neuter, vaccinations, heartworm test, and other tests,” said Spurling. “After they are healthy, I will bring them home.”

The main goal of the rescue is to give the animals a good life. When Spurling brings an animal home she is prepared to take care of that animal for the rest of its life. Adoption is a difficult process; not all homes are qualified to keep a pet. Potential adopters must fill out an application and references are called.

“I am extremely picky on potential homes,” she said. “I didn’t rescue them to be put back in another bad situation. My commitment extends for their entire lifetime. I do have an adoption application and I will call references and a vet before making any decisions. Not everyone deserves to have an animal. I say ‘no’ to homes more than I say ‘yes’.”

Spurlings most recent rescue was a rottweiler named Treasure. She was shot in the head three times for unknown reasons. Treasure is currently at a vet clinic undergoing rehab. She is expected to make a full recovery minus the use of one of her eyes.

Spurling plans on opening up a website for fans and potential adopters after her retirement. As of right now she said she is not taking in anymore strays due to space and financial reasons.

Spurling has no plans to expand due to economic reasons but does plan on maintaining the size and number of animals she has currently. One thing that will stay constant is the love she has for animals.

To learn more, contact Missy Spurling via Facebook or contact North Hills Animal Hospital at 501-835-3577.

TOP STORY >> CAF Social Pillar: TLR Rocks Arkansas Special Olympics

By Staff Sgt. Jacob Barreiro
19th Airlift Wing Public Affairs

“Let me win, but if I cannot win, let me be brave in the attempt.”

The Harding University football stadium echoed with the above words as thousands of athletes and their supporters flocked to Searcy, Ark., to compete in the Arkansas Summer Special Olympics May 23 - 25.

Among the competitors was a three-person team from Little Rock Air Force Base coached by Master Sgt. Beth Jungk, a 19th Communications Squadron plans and programs manager.

Officially called “Team Herc” the crew is comprised of three dependents on base: Morgan Jungk, Beth’s daughter; Catherine Hayes, daughter of Catherine and Michael Hayes, and Cody Anderson, son of Philip and Kiley Anderson.

The athletes competed in a variety of contests during the three-day event, which kicked off with an opening ceremony May 23 in Harding University’s football stadium.

The opening ceremonies included a formal introduction of all the athletes, hailing from 16 different districts in Arkansas, the official lighting of the Special Olympics torch, flown in by helicopter after being run throughout the state by the law enforcement torch run and live music from a band. Also, approximately 400 motorcyclists from throughout Arkansas rode into and took a ceremonial lap around the stadium in honor of the athletes. Jungk said most of the athletes love the opening ceremonies because of the grandeur and pomp surrounding them.

“When they lit the torch, Cody leaned over to his brother and said ‘these are just like real Olympics’,” said Jungk. “It’s awesome to see how excited they get.”

Morgan, diagnosed with autism, epilepsy, kabuki syndrome and  other ailments, competed in the tennis ball toss and 50 meter dash. Jungk said her inclusion in the running competition was special because it’s the first time Morgan ran in the Olympics.

“She’s had leg troubles her whole life, and this is the first year she’ll be competing in a run,” she said. “She’s had a lot of help getting ready for running at school, her teachers really helped a lot.”

Catherine, diagnosed with autism, competed in the softball toss and 100 meter dash, winning a bronze medal in the 100 meter dash and a silver in the softball toss.

Cody, diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome , competed in the softball toss and 100 meter dash, winning a bronze in the softball toss.

Morgan won a silver medal in the 50 meter dash.

Although each athlete competed hard to win their competitions, the spirit of the Special Olympics is inclusivity, hard work, courage and dedication and Jungk said she thinks the kids on her team show all of these traits by working together.

“It’s been great for Morgan, working with Cody and Catherine,” she said. “You can see how they help each other when they’re all together.”

Jungk said the team practices several times a week during the season, and although they’ll be taking a short break for summer, she looks forward to working with the kids to get ready for the next competition.

“These kids work so hard in practice to get ready for the games,” she said. “A lot of work goes into it.”

Jungk said her team, which competes in district 5, is open to more participants and encourages Team Little Rock parents with eligible children to join.

It’s a great way for disabled people to compete in a respectful and inclusive environment, she said. The games preach a message of tolerance and friendship among competitors, providing them an opportunity to demonstrate skill and capability despite suffering from intellectual or physical ailments.

Anyone interested in joining Team Herc can call Jungk at 615-5451. She said the team can also use volunteers to assist in training. The games are open to a wide variety of people of various disability types and levels.

“We can always use more help,” she said. “Volunteers, competitors, either way it’s something great to be involved in. We want to get the word out on base that we’d love to see more people out here.”

The games have a long list of sports available to compete in including, but not limited to, volleyball, power lifting, soccer, flag football, softball, floor hockey, golf, tennis, gymnastics and bowling. For a comprehensive list of sports open to competition or more information on the Special Olympics, visit http://www.specialolympicsarkansas.org/.

COMMENTARY >> Integrity first: Difference between the 99 percent and the 1 percent

By Lt. Col. Pat Dabrowski
314th Operations Group deputy commander

We are all familiar with many of the recent negative actions of the few Airmen and service members whose moral compasses were not guided by our Core Values and who are consequently no longer serving their country in the military. Both the Air Force and the entire Department of Defense have been impacted by their wayward actions. Yet the remaining 99 percent of Airmen maintain the principles of General Douglas McArthur’s famous closing words from his farewell address to the cadets of West Point: “duty, honor, country.” Two of those words still endure in the U.S. Army’s seven current core values: duty and honor. As Airmen, it is our duty to maintain our Core Values; our “moral compass”; our “keen sense of right and wrong.”

The Air Force Core Values of Integrity First, Service Before Self, and Excellence In All We Do have become the pillars of our service, whether we learned them in basic training, read them at the bottom of every PowerPoint slide sent from Headquarters Air Force, or repeatedly spot them on a poster in our unit’s hallway. The understanding of these values is so fundamental to how we conduct ourselves as professional Airmen that the Air Force took the effort to further define them in an Air Force Instruction: AFI 1-1 “Air Force Standards.” According to former Secretary of the Air Force, Sheila Widnall (1993-1997), the “Core values make the military what it is; without them, we cannot succeed. They are the values that instill confidence, earn lasting respect, and create willing followers. They are the values that anchor resolve in the most difficult situations. They are the values that buttress mental and physical courage when we enter combat. In essence, they are the three pillars of professionalism that provide the foundation for military leadership at every level.”

If I think back far enough, I still remember as a young Airman standing before a group of Senior Non-Commissioned Officers as a candidate for the wing’s Airman of the Quarter board. One of the board’s interview questions was to list the Air Force Core Values and explain which was the most important and why. In a world where seemingly few things are black and white, I thought it obvious that if there was a greater among equals then Integrity First was clearly the correct answer. Somehow I stumbled my way through explaining to the board that in my view Service Before Self and Excellence In All We Do can be arguably somewhat subjective and situationally dependent. But to me, Integrity is an absolute. In listing the Core Values it is designated as “First” and the principal value named. Former Vice Presidential candidate, Vietnam War Veteran, and Hanoi Hilton Prisoner of War Admiral James B. Stockdale described the power of refusing any compromise in integrity when he stated that “In 1965, I was crippled and I was all alone (in a North Vietnamese prison). I realized that they had all the power. I couldn’t see how I was ever going to get out with my honor and self-respect. The one thing I came to realize was that if you don’t lose your integrity you can’t be had and you can’t be hurt. Compromises multiply and build up when you’re working against a skilled extortionist or manipulator. You can’t be had if you don’t take that first shortcut, or ‘meet them halfway,’ as they say, or look for that tacit deal, or make that first compromise.” As AFI 1-1 explains the characteristic, it is “the willingness to do what is right even when no one is looking.” It is “the basis for trust” and many would agree that it is difficult to “sort of” trust someone; either we have faith in them or we don’t. We ourselves are either trusted or we’re not. Either our actions are right or they fall short. We either have integrity or we don’t. And any violation of that flawless standard can result in others questioning our reliability and should lead to our own self-reflection of our actions.

Freshman cadets at the United States Air Force Academy are issued a pocket-sized handbook of general USAF history and knowledge. Contained within is a vivid quote by British General S.L.A. Marshall that has been memorized by future officers for decades, which gives practical application to the term Integrity. Marshall stated that “a man has integrity if his interest in the good of the service is at all times greater than his personal pride, and when he holds himself to the same line of duty when unobserved as he would follow if his superiors were present.” As with any good quote, this one stands on its own words and clearly articulates the unconditional behavior that sets what we’ve been called to do as professional Airmen, apart from labeling what we’ve been called to as just a job or an occupation. At times, however, overshadowing the personification of the Core Values by the 99 percent of adherents is the 1 percent whose actions show that they have failed to internalize the concepts. And most commanders and supervisors will say that it’s the 1 percent that take up a larger portion of their time than they should.

Comedian Groucho Marx was once quoted as saying that “the secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you’ve got it made.” Everyone knows that doing the right thing won’t always be easy. We can all think back to times when being the voice of integrity resulted in internal strife or alienated us from our peers as we followed our “moral compass” in the pursuit of what we knew to be right. In some instances the issue was a small one and at other times it may have been life-changing.

One individual from deep in our pre-USAF history who stood for what he knew to be right was Brigadier General Billy Mitchell in his aggressive advocacy of airpower for future wars. Following his experiences in World War I, Mitchell was eventually court-martialed and forced to resign from the Army for his insubordination while trying to do what he knew to be right, to campaign the War Department for the increased investment in airpower. His battle cry for the need for military airpower in the 1920s generated government and civilian action that was a catalyst for the development of combat aviation that we’re all part of today. The moniker that many attach to Billy Mitchell is that of a maverick, but his outspokenness aside, one person’s maverick may not be far from another person’s “Airman, fueled by innovation” doing what they know to be right. Many of General Mitchell’s peers advised him against his dissident and unconventional views. But think of where we as an Air Force might be today if not for the integrity of one man to champion a radical idea against a sea of traditionalists. While many of us will not be called on to defend our integrity in a congressional committee, in today’s fiscally constrained environment we must ensure all Airmen are innovatively doing the right thing for the right reason while still being willing to take calculated, bold risks to lead us to success. While outright insubordination toward our supervisors and commanders will most likely not achieve the goal we are advocating (Mitchell’s situation was arguably a one-time “good deal”) we must all be willing to put our Integrity First to do what we know to be the right thing.

Despite some of the distressing headlines on the cover of Air Force Times as a result of the actions of the 1 percent, the 99 percent continue to demonstrate, preserve, and propagate the Air Force Core Values. To survive as a service, the Air Force must take some valuable and actionable lessons from the transgressions of the 1 percent: those who do not practice mutual respect, professionalism and trust. The 99 percent must move forward with discipline on our quest to become “The World’s Greatest Air Force powered by Airmen, fueled by innovation” and built on the unwavering foundation of our Air Force Core Values of Service and Excellence, led by Integrity. In deference to Benjamin Franklin’s famous quip that “honesty is the best policy” General Robert E. Lee countered that “the trite saying that honesty is the best policy has met with the just criticism that honesty is not policy. The real honest man is honest from conviction of what is right, not from policy.” With or without AFI 1-1 enlightening us to the Air Force Core Values, we are blessed as a service that the 99 percent already get it.    

Thursday, May 23, 2013

COMMENTARY>>How do we balance it all?

By Col. James Hodges
6th Mission Support Group commander

MACDILL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. – I was speaking to a group of company grade officers recently and one of them asked, “How do you balance it all?”

He knew that I had a very busy job with a lot of demands on my time. He also knew that I had a family and, quite possibly, some personal interests as well. How do I balance it all? The answer is that I have to be deliberate to make sure I fit it all in.

The best way of framing how to be deliberate, balance the demands of life and have fun while in the Air Force is the concept of Comprehensive Airman Fitness.

Comprehensive Airman Fitness encompasses all aspects of life and is described by its four pillars: mental, physical, social and spiritual. Ensuring I take care of the various aspects of life helps me keep it all in balance.

I am a civil engineer, so construction and architecture appeal to me. I like the imagery of a classic and beautiful Greek architectural structure being supported by four pillars. The pillars supporting the structure must be strong and balanced. If one pillar is not balanced or not strong enough, then the structure suffers. The other pillars have to carry the extra load.

However, the ingenuity of having multiple pillars is that they spread the load of the building across the columns and, when they are used together, are much stronger as a whole than they are individually.

Another engineering benefit of having multiple pillars is that if one is weakened, the others can help carry the extra load until the weak pillar can be repaired and re-strengthened.

The four pillars of one’s own Comprehensive Airman Fitness are analogous to the Greek structure, in that when strong and in balance they can carry incredible loads. Even when some areas are suffering, the others can help carry the burden until the weak areas are strengthened.

When explaining to the company grade officers how I apply this in my life, I used my typical weekly life rhythm to illustrate. Sundays are critical for my life balance and serve as my best example of integrating all the pillars of Comprehensive Airman Fitness. I typically start my week on Sunday with a restful sleep-in to refresh my physical pillar and charge up for the coming week.

I have moments of quietness and relaxation by sitting on the front porch with a cup of coffee while enjoying the beautiful nature of Florida. Those activities help take some stress off of my mental pillar.

I also take a walk with my wife and dog along the bay to invigorate each of the pillars. I attend church with my family and see friends there to strengthen my spiritual and social pillars.

I usually work out or do physical activities with my kids, and that address all of the pillars as well. You can see that Sundays are critical for me and in my typical life rhythm they ensure I keep all of my life’s pillars strong so that I can withstand whatever challenges the events of the coming week throw at me.

When sprinting through the workweek, I also strive to stay in balance. I make time for fitness to start off my day before work, at least three times a week. Whether I run along Bayshore Boulevard, workout in my home gym or PT with hundreds of my favorite 6th Maintenance Group Airmen, starting my day with a fitness activity strengthens my physical pillar as well as relieving stress to invigorate my mental pillar. When I PT with my 6th MSG Airmen, it also strengthens my social pillar and lifts my spirits.

I work hard during the day and try to make each minute count. My work always stimulates my intellect and, like working out, makes me more fit. A good day full of challenges strengthens my mental pillar.

I gain a lot of strength for my social pillar by working to accomplish our missions alongside our great Airmen, civilian and contractor teammates. However, when I get home, I’m tired. Spending some time with my family, helping with homework, taking the dog for a walk along the bay and making sure I get a good night of sleep all recharge me across the board.

Finally, Saturday is a welcome day to end the week to rest, recuperate, spend time with friends and family, enjoy personal interests and serve the community in other ways.

At the end of this typical week, I find I’ve addressed all aspects of Comprehensive Airman Fitness, taken care of myself and my family and reinvigorated my “house” by making sure all the pillars are balanced and strong.

TOP STORY>>Rock Spring Cleaning strives to make ‘Every Dollar Count’

By 19th Airlift Wing Public Affairs

Before heading to their homes or destination of choice for a long weekend of relaxation, barbecues, pools, family or friend time, the people of Little Rock Air Force Base busted out the broom and dustpan this week for some Spring Cleaning.

The goal of the TLR Spring Cleaning is to reallocate or remove any excess, outdated, or nonfunctional items in the work place, said Capt. Benjamin Trembath, who’s spearheading the spring cleaning campaign.

In addition to sprucing up the workplace, the wing wants to document the value in terms of dollar amount, disk and work space for office equipment, furniture, supplies, papers and publications and shared drive space.

People must identify and photograph items they believe are outdated or nonfunctional, along with a description of the item and its quality, condition and dollar value.

After that, the base plans to set up a Sharepoint site that will work similar to the website Craig’s List, said Trembath. People will then have the opportunity to “shop” or find items they may need. Everyone on base is encouraged to participate and help their unit points of contact in identifying items they no longer need.

This move comes in the wake of budgets shrinking, while Air Force leaders call on Airmen to share their best money-saving ideas through the Every Dollar Counts campaign. Team Little Rock is pitching in with its spring cleaning initiative.

In the wake of sequestration, the initiative marks a cultural shift that empowers Airmen to find and recommend areas for savings that may be used to support readiness needs, said Air Force Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Larry Spencer.

For the rest of the month, Airmen can submit their cost-reducing ideas via the Airmen Powered by Innovation websites while at home, the office or on their smartphone. Links to those sites are available through the Air Force Portal.

“When things get tough, Airmen figure outa way to get it done,” Spencer said. “We have some of the most innovative folks in the world, so I know there are ideas about how we can do things better.”

Furthermore, he said, the Air Force must trim about $11 billion in the last half of fiscal year 2013. Additionally, our overseas contingency operations funding is almost $2 billion short so we have to make up that difference as well.

And the challenge is compounded by the sequester timeline, which officially began March 1.

“We have to squeeze a year’s worth of cuts into about six months,” Spencer said of the Air Force budget. “So there’s a lot of money to be taken out of our budget in a short period of time … I’ve never seen anything quite like it.”

Airmen at every level should feel less encumbered by perhaps dated or unnecessary Air Force Instructions or guidelines when brainstorming cost-cutting measures, the general said.

“Airmen Powered by Innovation means go into that file of good ideas that were maybe ‘too hard to do,’ pull them out and submit them,” Spencer declared. “If it’s a good idea and requires an Air Force Instruction change, then we’ll see if we can do that.”

Spencer wants Airmen to submit their ideas regardless of the idea’s potential savings.

“Whether it’s $500, $1 million or $30 million, we want to hear it because those dollars add up,” he said.

“We’re taking every angle we can to manage our money and ‘buy’ as much mission as we can,” he said. “In that sense, every Airman, whether they’re at a wing or headquarters, can help.”

“This is an opportunity to not only look at homegrown ideas, but broader ideas that affect the larger Air Force as well.”

The general expressed optimism in quickly finding solutions through ideas.

“Innovation is what we’re all about,” Spencer said. “This is our family and we’re going to get through this because we’ve got great Airmen to help see us through this.”

TOP STORY>>Observing Police Week

By Airman 1st Class Cliffton Dolezal
19th Airlift Wing Public Affairs

On May 4, 1963 President John F. Kennedy signed a proclamation designating May 15 as Peace Officers Memorial Day and the calendar week of May 15 each year occurs as Police Week. Little Rock did its part in honoring peace officers by holding events around the base throughout the week to raise awareness about their job while remaining vigilant and safeguarding the community.

Police Week is a week-long observance in honor of federal, state and local officers who have been injured, disabled or, in the case of Team Little Rock members Staff Sgt. John Self and Staff Sgt. Dustin Peters, people who paid the ultimate sacrifice supporting operations in Iraq. Throughout the week people all over the United States affiliated with the police force shut down their businesses and took time off work to pay tribute to those who serve and those who have fallen.

“Every day cops put their lives on the line.” said Tech. Sgt. Robert Miller, a 19th Security Forces Squadron plans noncommissioned officer. “You don’t know what you are going to respond to or what you are going to have to deal with, you just hope you can make it to the next day.”

The men and women of the United States Air Force Security Forces man the gates of bases all around the world through all types of inclement weather, twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week. They defend the Constitution here or wherever the call of duty might come. They methodically conduct missions behind enemy lines, as well as care for others around them.

In proclamation 3537, Kennedy said “It is fitting and proper that we express our gratitude for the dedicated service and courageous deeds of law enforcement officers and for the contributions they have made to the security and well-being of all our people,” and fifty years later, Little Rock Air Force Base still recognizes those words and continues to support all of the law enforcement community.

This past week the 19th SFS asked Team Little Rock to come out in support of the activities they had planned to reach out to the community and to demonstrate their skills. The 19th SFS held numerous events around the base in Support of Police Week.

Monday morning the Security Forces Squadron on base took part in a 24-hour ruck march at Heritage Park in remembrance of all fallen law enforcement officers from the base as well as the United States.

“The constant movement for 24 hours was just a small way to remember those who didn’t stop for us.” said Miller.

Tuesday, a golf tournament was held at the Deer Run golf course where Team Little Rock members were asked to come out and support the Booster Club.

Wednesday, a demonstration was held to showcase skills and weapons used by today’s law enforcement, along with a K-9 demonstration and a taser demonstration. For the taser demonstration volunteers were taken from the audience to display the effects of the taser on a subject.

“The demonstration was held to show our capabilities and raise awareness of our first responders.” said Maj. Peter Lex, 19th Security Forces Squadron commander.

Thursday, a Memorial service was held to remember Self and Peters as well as all others who paid the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty while deployed.

“Many of the guys from the 19th SFS were friends with Self and enjoy interacting with his family,” said Lex.

The families of the fallen Team Little Rock members were in attendance for the ceremony, which was held at the 19th Security Forces Building where a memorial stands for Sgt, Self.

“The ceremony is something we have done for several years and is a small way to show the base and his family that we still remember Staff Sgt. Self and the sacrifice he made.” said Lex.

Being an officer of the law can be a thankless job. They wake up each morning not knowing what challenges they will have to face that day and are often unappreciated until they are needed. The men and women of the law enforcement community serve, protect and make the general public a safer place.

Thursday, May 16, 2013

CLASSIFIEDS 05-24-13


ANNOUNCEMENTS

THE COMBAT AIRLIFTER CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT will take ads by phone from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday 982-9421, or you may mail your ad to 404 Graham Rd., Jacksonville, Ark. 72078. You may also e-mail them to combatairlifterclassifieds@arkansasleader.com Deadline to advertise in Friday's issue is 5 p.m. Tuesday.


YARD SALES

YARD SALE, 5/25, 7 am-2 pm, 160 Peach, Austin. Lots of good stuff.


HELP WANTED

DRIVERS: MAKE $63,000 year more, $2,500 Driver Referral Bonus & $1,200 Orientation Completion Bonus! CDL-A OTR experience required. Call now: 1-888-993-0972.


HORSES

HORSES: LUCKY Acres Boarding Stable, TLC for your horse, box stalls and paddocks, clean pastures, indoor and outdoor arenas, riding instruction and training program. Dressage our specialty. (501) 988-2458.


PETS

AQUARIUM, 55 gallon w/stand & accessories, $150. (501) 259-1395.


AUTOS/ACCESSORIES

2010 MUSTANG Convertible, torch red, black top, V-6, 5-spd. automatic, 37,000 miles, like new condition with excellent miles per gallon & fun to drive. Price reduced to $17,500. (501) 231-6184.

2008 FORD Expedition EL, immaculate condition, loaded, serviced regularly, must see to believe, 31,156 miles, $26,000. Call/text (501) 425-2799.

ATV TIRES, Dunlop, 2 at size 25x10-12, & 2 at size 25x8-12, used but good amount of tread remains, $40 for all. (501) 843-2187.

GREAT BUY!! 2004 Grand Marquis, good mileage, clean interior, $2,850 obo. Don't miss out! (501) 241-1883 or (501) 658-3224.

2012 CHEVROLET Camaro wheels, 2-20x8, 2-20x9, only 2,400 miles, great condition, $550 obo. (501) 743-5385, leave msg.

2008 HONDA CR-V LX 4-door, black, 64,000 miles, excellent condition, $11,800. (501) 554-3508.

1998 TOYOTA Rav4, tinted windows, cold A/C, good tires, black, 5-spd., CD, aux. hookup, 4WD, 152,000 miles, runs well, $3,300 obo. Call/text (501) 410-2752.

1968 CHEVY C10 project truck, SWB/fleet side, metal bed, lg. back window, comes w/extra hood, doors, rocker panels, cab corners, grill, etc. No motor or trans., $1,650 obo. (501) 773-7741.

2003 FORD F150 King Ranch, runs but will need a new 5.4L, $7,300. (501) 773-7741.


RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

2009 HONDA CBR600RR, 5,000 miles, clean, never dropped or laid down, lots of extras, $6,500 obo. (414) 313-9517.

2008 HONDA CBR600RR, 8,700 miles, $7,000 obo. (918) 978-5012.


ITEMS FOR SALE

SCHOOL BOOKS, 50 Essays, 3rd edition by Samuel Cohen, $18; Easy Writer, 4th edition by Andrea A. Lunsford, $25. (501) 786-3803.

COLEMAN CAMP stove & lantern, use or class as antiques, bought new in early '70s, used once, still in orig. box, use liquid fuel, like new, $75 for both. (501) 843-2187.

CRAFTSMAN, HEAVY duty shop vice, 5" jaw width, opens to 9", weight 50 lbs., USA made, excellent condition, $50 cash. (501) 843-2187.

KENMORE WASHER & dryer, work well, $300. (443) 243-7583.


HOUSES FOR RENT

3 bedroom 2 bath mobile home, 1.5 miles off 107, late model, nice front porch. Also 2 bedroom 1 bath, on Hwy. 107, newly remodeled, water & gas paid, no mowing. Call Ed 501-988-5187.

3 BEDROOM, 2 bath, living room, den with fireplace, kitchen with stove, refrigerator & dishwasher, laundry area, 2-car garage, fenced backyard, pets considered with nonrefundable pet deposit. Close to air base, Stonewall subdivision, on cul-de-sac. $975 plus deposit. Call (501) 529-7767 or (501) 529-7624.

CLEAN 3 bedroom, 2 bath on Jacksonville cul-de-sac, Stonewall. All appliances & washer/dryer, fireplace, deck, HOA pool & T-court, 2-car garage with openers. $975 month. (805) 402-7424.


HOUSES FOR SALE

VA NO money down, liberal help with buyer's closing costs. 2215 sq. ft. brick house on 5 acres near LRAFB. Price reduced, completely updated. Homebuyer's warranty available. Doug Wilkinson, 982-1517. Call Jack, 804-1616 or Rhonda, 590-6598.

BRIEFS 05-24-13

Retirement slated May 31

Retirement scheduled for Senior Master Sgt. Fitzgerald Johnson will be held at 2 p.m. May 31 at Building 362’s Heritage Room.

Youth Challenge opportunity

If you are 16-18 years old and having difficulty in school or have dropped out, Youth Challenge may be a solution. For the opportunity to earn a free Arkansas High School diploma and 15-college credit hours by 15 Dec. 2013, call 1-800-814-8453 or 501-212-5304.

19th MDG closures June 5

The 19th Medical Group will be closed June 5 for Wingman Day and July 24 for the MARE.

Harris Gate closure May 31

The school gate will close May 31 at 4:30 p.m. It will reopen at 6 a.m. Aug 19 for the start of next year’s classes.

TOP STORY >> Travel: Branson, Mo.

By Senior Airman Regina Agoha
19th Airlift Wing Public Affairs


Visiting Branson, Mo., was not on my list of things to do for my off-duty time, but a stroke of good luck at this year’s Family Fun Fest Easter Egg hunt helped change my mind.

My one-year old daughter found the “golden ticket” – a weekend get-away at this small city nestled in the Ozark Mountains. The getaway included a paid two-night stay at a hotel of my choice, two tickets to Ripley’s Believe it or Not and two tickets to Silver Dollar City.

At first, I had my reservations because I was “too young” for Branson; I had heard opinions suggesting it was for “old people”. But always wanting to give things an honest chance, I, my husband and daughter packed the car, and hit the open road with an open mind.
Watching the sun set through the beauty of the trees, rocks and rivers of the Ozarks made the three-and-a-half hour drive seem like a 30 minute ride. Once I got to Branson, driving to the hotel on the city’s main strip, the bright colors, flashing lights and neon signs made me think of a slower paced, family friendly version of Vegas.

The next morning, we decided to make our first stop at the Ripley’s Believe it or Not Odditorium. Being a fan of the TV show, I was excited to learn of more interesting stories. The yellow, 10,000 sq. ft. building, which was purposely constructed in a way where the building looks like the after effects of an earthquake can be seen from miles away.
Don’t let the fa├žade fool you; it is a fitting welcome to this earth-shattering shrine to the strange and bizarre.

Even if you’re not a lover of the unexplained, you’ll find something at Ripley’s Believe It or Not to enjoy. As we toured the Odditorium, we saw displays like the wax model of Robert Wadlow, the tallest man in the world, standing at 8’11”, 440 lbs. and wearing size 37AA shoes. Also hanging on the wall on display, is Liu Ch’ung, who was born with double pupils in each eye, believe it or not.

After taking pictures and freaking my one year-old out with the human lizard man wax statue, that was completely green and had a split tongue, we ended our tour with a stop at the gift shop. There we met a very nice Brandon Ely, Ripley’s store manager.

“This Odditorium was built in 1994 and is one of the biggest tourist attractions in Branson,” he said. “We’re open seven days a week, 365 days a year. Active military and their immediate families get in half price.”

Because there are so many family friendly establishments in this one particular area, we decided to take a walk. Right down the road is the Titanic Museum, which is the town’s largest museum attraction. The two-story museum, which was opened in 2006, is shaped like the Titanic itself. The museum holds 400 pre-discovery artifacts in 20 galleries.
During our walk, we came across Starvin’ Marvin’s, which is a great place to stop and grab a delicious homecooked style meal. It was around lunch time, and we were hungry; we decided to check it out.

While there, we truly experienced the Midwestern hospitality as well as enjoyed an affordable lunch buffet for $8.99 plus a 10 percent military discount. Any seat to the right side of the buffet table offers a view of mother nature at its best with rocky hills in sight.
At the end of our meal, we met Lisa Neal, a Shepherd of the Hills representative. She gave us a map of the area and informed us on what was going on in the area during the time of our stay. She said there’s something to do for everyone in Missouri.

“I’ve been here for 20 years, and this place is great for families to visit,” she said. “It’s a very family oriented town. It doesn’t promote much alcohol and gambling. There’s over 100 live shows and a million attractions. I would definitely encourage people to come visit.” 

If you see Neal when you go, she may invite you to visit the Shepherd of the Hills, which is also open year round. Home to the highest point in Southwest Mo., Inspiration Tower. If you take a trip to the top of the 230-foot tower, you can see the Ozark Hills, all of Branson and even the Arkansas ridge of the hills.

My husband and I put on our adventurous hats and took part in an extremely high flying, 60 second zip line ride, the Vigilante Extreme ZipRider, which is typically $30 per person. From the observation deck, we boarded one of four seated zip lines that sent us sailing over the 160-acre park at speeds up to 50 mph.

Feeling a sense of accomplishment, we headed to Branson’s Silver Dollar City theme park, which wrapped our trip. There is a 13-acre White Water theme park, Showboat dinner cruise and a Wilderness log cabin with RVs and camping area.

Because we had our little one, we made this part of the trip about her. We did merry-go-rounds and the theatrical train ride that gave us a tour of the park and also introduced us to the Outlaw Run, which features the world’s first and only double barrel roll on a wood coaster, with a 720-degree double barrel roll. This ride is the only wood coaster to twist upside down three times. It’s the world’s steepest wood coaster with a drop of 162 feet at 81 degrees, and it is the second fastest wood coaster in the world, reaching 68 mph.  

At the end of my trip, we reached our own conclusion. Not only was this place fun, but it was family friendly, filled with different activities, and we’d like to one day go again to visit places we weren’t able to this time.

The options abound for military and their families looking for some fun outside of Arkansas, without having to take leave, since Branson is well within the six-hour limit for the “local area.” Fill your gas tank, grab some family or friends, put in your favorite traveling CD and enjoy the scenery as you head to Branson for your next get away.

TOP STORY >> Off-Duty: Paranormal Airman

By Senior Airman Rusty Frank
19th Airlift Wing/Public Affairs


When the sun sets and a full moon rises on a eerie spring night, and all you can hear is the hiss of the wind blowing on the leaves  and the muffled sounds of passing cars echoing off the grave stones in an old Confederate cemetery, most people would be afraid. For Staff Sgt. Justin Rangel, a 345th Recruiting Squadron recruiter, this is a normal environment for him on his off-duty time.   

 Rangel’s off duty job takes him into the darkest and scariest places for some people, because in his off time he is a paranormal investigator.

“Paranormal investigating is the approach of being able to validate a paranormal claim through scientific research or investigation,” he said.

Rangel is co-lead investigator on the team and a technical specialist with the Fort Worth Paranormal team based out of Dallas Fort Worth, Texas. When Rangel first started out, people in the paranormal community dubbed him the “paranormal Airman.”

Rangel said his spooky ghost story infatuation began as a youth. While staying over at a friend’s house, a shadowy figure appeared over him. He said couldn’t breathe, because of the feeling of extreme pressure on his chest. In the midst of the encounter, he remembered his grandma’s advice, whenever he feels scared, he should call upon the name of Jesus. Then the haunting figure disappeared.

That ghostly encounter triggered his curiosity into the paranormal, and inspired his quest to figure out what it was he experienced that night.

“The whole paranormal thing has always been an interest of mine. I’ve been doing research on the paranormal and looking into different stories about the afterlife outside of (traditional) religious beliefs since 1999,” said Rangel.

Even though Rangel was doing research in 1999, he really didn’t start actively investigating with the paranormal until about nine years ago.

“I actually started investigating back in 2004, it was pretty much right after my last deployment, and right before my first recruiting job,” said Rangel. “We got a team together and asked permission to go into places (to investigate).  We started establishing ourselves in the local community in Louisiana. We actually started investigating before the whole ghost hunter thing went mainstream.”

When Rangel goes out on an investigation he uses different equipment and technologies to measure energy. He commonly uses standard electromagnetic field readers and other pieces of measuring equipment to get a base reading on the location his team is investigating.

Thanks to social media, Rangel and the Fort Worth Paranormal have people from across the country seeking their unique skills.

“People usually find us on our Facebook fan page, or our website,” said Rangel.
When his team receives a request to investigate a location, they thoroughly interview the client. After the interview, they decide how many team members they need for the investigation. The team will then split the responsibilities of the investigation. Some will research the history of the location, while the others will do a site visit.  After everything is complete, they unmask the results of their findings to the client.

Throughout his career as a paranormal scrutinizer, Rangel has had a lot of chilling experiences both good and bad.

One experience that Rangel vividly recalls was when his team was investigating the haunted, Hotel Marshall in Marshall, Texas, where a tragic event happened on an evening in August 2012. During their investigation inside the hotel. Rangel recalled he and his partner were asking questions and shooting video, when suddenly his partner started complaining of a feeling much more intense than the “heebie jeebies.” It was during this time that his friend started to complain about a burning sensation on his back. Rangel lifted up the shirt and saw deep scratches that appeared and welted up right before his eyes.

Rangel and his ghost hunter team offer open minded analysis of supernatural encounters for clients regardless of religious affiliations or locations.

“We do this as a service to the community, for those folks who are too afraid to talk about certain things and speak out about their experiences,” said Rangel. “We are here to help.”
Rangel said he uses integrity, an Air Force core value, and applies it to his paranormal investigation.

“As far as experiences in the Air Force, first and foremost the integrity approach, because you don’t want to go out there and approach an investigation with a bunch of falsities,” said Rangel.

For more information on paranormal investigating contact Fort Worth Paranormal at http://www.fortworthparanormal.com/

COMMENTARY >> Talent and hustle

By Col. Andrew Lockert
19th Maintenance Group commander


Each of us not only have our own goals and dreams but we also have the desire to live life to the fullest.  In order to get there, we need the drive and fortitude to make the necessary changes and decisions to get to our desired end state.  We are all wired to want more, to make improvements in our lives and in ourselves in order to be the best person we can.  How do I get there you might ask?  Simply put, it boils down to two things—attitude and aptitude.

Attitude, defined simply is your mindset and determination to do a job.  It is your desire to learn and apply that learning.  Our attitudes are the beliefs we have that help interpret situations and develop reactions based on those interpretations.  Your attitude is the basis for determining how much and what you can do.  Think of your attitude as an engine—it’ll help you go forward or it’ll slow you down. 

Aptitude is your ability, talent or competency to perform a particular task. It is your potential to learn skills and apply those skills.  By utilizing our skills and talents, we begin to realize what we are capable of and further develop our aptitude.

We were all born with a knack for doing something—be it athletic ability, mechanical skill or artistic prowess.  We all know attitude and aptitude go hand-in-hand; in some cases we’ve experienced where one or the other have played a role in our lives.  Attitude and aptitude have helped us attain a goal or hindered us from reaching others.  We’ve all had a feedback session from our boss that started out “you’re a great ____, however, you need to work on your attitude” or “I love your attitude, if your competency matched your attitude, you’d be the best in the business”.


Each of us have been the recipient of good and bad service, as well as positive and negative attitudes; we all know those experiences directly translate into our overall perception of that individual and the organization they represent.  Truth be told, human nature allows us to overlook poor service in lieu of a great attitude. 


Consider this situation during an inspection.  If both your attitude and aptitude are outstanding, you will have no problem, whatsoever, passing an inspection.  If one of these traits is missing, your inspection could be an entirely different experience.  Despite having the best abilities in the world, a horrible attitude will hinder your ability to communicate with the inspector, therefore, possibly having an adverse effect on your overall rating. 


On the other hand, if you have a positive attitude and do not get too discouraged or flustered, most inspectors will be more apt to provide some guidance to help you out or extra time to answer a question.  The inspector will be more likely to work with an individual who is lower on aptitude but has a great attitude.  Alternatively, if you are the best at your job but have a bad attitude, it is highly unlikely the inspector will give you much leeway. 


Regardless of how you try to disguise it, your attitude will eventually show itself in your words, actions, inactions, or body language.  You will get more return on your investment by having a positive attitude.  Once you get that right, the rest will follow.  As the famous American motivational speaker, Zig Ziglar, once said, “your attitude, not our aptitude, determines your altitude.”  So, if you want to make it to the top, talent and hustle will get you there; however, if you are short on talent, pick up the hustle!

Thursday, May 9, 2013

BRIEFS>>5-10-13


FAMILY ADVOCACY CLASSES OFFERED

“Dads: The Basics,” is set for 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 17.

“Anger Management” is set for 1 to 4 p.m. May 13 and May 20.

All classes will be held at the Family Advocacy Office, please call 987-7377 to register.

MOTHER'S DAY BRUNCH SET

A Mother’s Day brunch will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday at Hangar 1080. Menu includes eggs made to order, omelets, eggs benedict, braised pork loin and more. Club Card members: $15.99, Non-members: $17.99. Ages 5-12: age + 99 cents; ages 4 and under, free.

MOMS BOWL FREE

Moms bowl for free from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday at the Bowling Center. Shoe rental is $1.25. For more information, call 987-3365.

PRE-DEPLOYMENT BRIEFING 

This is a mandatory brief for all personnel who are going to be TDY or Deployed for more than 30 days, conducted at the Airman and Family Readiness Center Bldg 668 from 9 to 10 a.m. Wednesday, call 501-987-6801 for an appointment

48TH AS CHANGE OF COMMAND

The 48th Airlift Squadron change-of-command ceremony is at 10 a.m. May 16 in Heritage Park, near the C-130J propeller. In case of inclement weather, the ceremony will be held in Hangar 1080.

ARMED FORCES KIDS RUN

America’s Armed Forces Kids Run, set for May 18, provides military dependent children the opportunity to participate in a worldwide fun activity. Children will run three distances based on their ages. For kids ages 5 to 12. Registration deadline is May 17. For more information, call the Youth Center at 987-6355.

EFMP FIELD DAY

This event is for EFMP members and their family. It consists of multiple activities in a field day setting from 9 a.m. to noon May 18. Call 501-987-6801 for more information and registration.

COMMENTARY>>The envious

By Chief Master Sgt. Bobby L. Hughes Jr.
19th Operations Group CCC

The envious spend so much time worrying about what everyone else is getting that they often miss the opportunities they themselves have to be recognized.

Opportunities to excel come up every day, yet the envious often miss them, then they wallow around in self-pity because everyone else is getting recognized except them.

There are two main problems with this:

 One, they are not out for the team, they are out for themselves. Every team will have their star player(s). This does not make the rest of the team any less important. As long as everyone remembers we are in this together the team will do well. Once someone puts their personal needs or desires ahead of the team, the team will function less efficiently and risks breaking down.

 Two, they don’t do things because they enjoy doing them or because they need to be done, they only do things that will get them recognized so they can fill their need for attention. Folks, when we do things for others there is a large amount of satisfaction that comes along with it. Most of the time this can and will fill our human need for attention. Needing attention is natural and OK. How you go about filling this need is up to you.

As a high performance team, we do not have time for the envious. We trust our leaders are fair and that they will ensure each of us gets our rewards. We all succeed or fail together.

We must see a win for one of our teammates as a win for all of us.

TOP STORY>>19th FSS upsets 19th CES in three-match thriller

By Airman 1st Class Cliffton Dolezal
19th Airlift wing/Public Affairs

The intramural volleyball teams from the 19th Force Support Squadron and the 19th Civil Engineer Squadron faced off Tuesday night, May 7, in exciting fashion going to a third match in a best of three series with the 19th FSS winning 25-19, 23-25, 15-12.

“We’re standing strong tonight, we’re not going to lose,” said Joseph Hosak, the 19th CES team captain.

The 19th FSS took a commanding lead in the first game going up by 12 at one point. They didn’t let up, dishing out several spikes and finishing long rallies. The team went on to take the first game 25-19.

The 19th CES bounced back in the second game answering with great serves and excellent net play, using their height to their advantage. Their dominance at the net seemed to combat the conservative play by the 19th FSS in the second game. The 19th CES won the second match forcing a game three in a best of three series.

Both teams brought their A-game and gave an extraordinary effort, laying out for the ball several times and having extended rallies. The 19th CES went up 12-9 before the 19th FSS called a timeout. The extra time given to the 19th FSS to catch their breath and focus was just what they needed. They came back onto the court with their heads high, knowing what they had to do. Winning the first serve after the time out, the 19th FSS would take control of the serve and go on to score six unanswered points to win match three 15-12 and the game 2-1.

TOP STORY>>C-130 squadron first to perform new airdrop method

By Capt. Brian Maguire
451st Air Expeditionary Wing Public Affairs

KANDAHAR AIRFIELD, Afghanistan – The 772nd Expeditionary Airlift Squadron executed the first combat Extracted Container Delivery System airdrop the morning of April 29, successfully demonstrating the increased accuracy that this new technology provides.

The new airdrop method, known by the shorthand XCDS, is designed to pull the CDS bundles out of the aircraft at a faster rate than the current airdrop process, which improves the overall accuracy of the drop itself.

“Normally a bundle falls out of the aircraft due to gravity, with the speed mostly dependent on the deck angle of the aircraft,” said Capt. Raeanna Elms, 772nd EAS and Longmont, Colo., native who is deployed from Little Rock Air Force Base. “With XCDS, there is an additional parachute attached to a group of bundles, that pulls them out of the aircraft together and at a faster speed, resulting in a smaller dispersion area on the ground.”

For the loadmasters working with the CDS bundles, the new method adds more complexity to the rigging inside the aircraft, said Senior Airman Marisa Powers, 772nd EAS loadmaster and Coventry, R.I., native. Because of the added complexity, Powers and her fellow loadmaster on the mission were very thorough in their preparations.

“We needed to seriously hit the books more than usual, get in there and read everything a million times and understand,” Powers, who is deployed from the 143rd Airlift Wing of the Rhode Island National Guard, said. “My partner and I felt like we did a great job, sitting there for a solid two hours and highlighting, saying ‘this is what I feel like is important and we›ll go over it again tonight.’”

Crews with the 772nd EAS received some XCDS training back at home station before deploying. For Powers, the training included one flight back in the States, plus ground qualification. They came here qualified, but the new procedures still had a learning curve.

“It was definitely a little more complicated of a drop,” Powers said. “Because it was the first time in theater we obviously didn’t want to mess it up, but we went line by line, sentence by sentence to double, triple check that every tie was made right, that every knot was in place.”

Powers was part of the aircrew on the first mission, and her humble nature made the airdrop sound as if it was no big deal.

“I’m just doing my job. It’s awesome that we were the first, but I was just doing my job,” she said. “All that aside, it’s the mission in the end we’re looking towards, it’s the safety of the guys on the other end receiving it. It’s all about helping the guys downrange.”

After the bundles were pulled out the back of the aircraft, a surprising sight, according to Powers, since the CDS bundles usually trickle out the back, the accuracy of the XCDS drop was proven. The dispersion of the bundles on the drop zone was about two-thirds smaller, highlighting the value of the XCDS method in having the best placement for the soldiers.

“Our goal is to get the people on the ground what they need, where they want it,” Elms said. “Plus, since we’re trying to build a positive relationship with the local people, we want a more accurate airdrop method that reduces the risk of a stray bundle damaging their homes and crops.”

Thursday, May 2, 2013

BRIEFS>>5-10-13

FAMILY ADVOCACY CLASSES OFFERED

“Dads: The Basics,” is set for 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 17.

“Anger Management” is set for 1 to 4 p.m. May 13 and May 20.

All classes will be held at the Family Advocacy Office, please call 987-7377 to register.

MOTHER'S DAY BRUNCH SET

A Mother’s Day brunch will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday at Hangar 1080. Menu includes eggs made to order, omelets, eggs benedict, braised pork loin and more. Club Card members: $15.99, Non-members: $17.99. Ages 5-12: age + 99 cents; ages 4 and under, free.

MOMS BOWL FREE

Moms bowl for free from noon to 6 p.m. Sunday at the Bowling Center. Shoe rental is $1.25. For more information, call 987-3365.

PRE-DEPLOYMENT BRIEFING 

This is a mandatory brief for all personnel who are going to be TDY or Deployed for more than 30 days, conducted at the Airman and Family Readiness Center Bldg 668 from 9 to 10 a.m. Wednesday, call 501-987-6801 for an appointment

48TH AS CHANGE OF COMMAND

The 48th Airlift Squadron change-of-command ceremony is at 10 a.m. May 16 in Heritage Park, near the C-130J propeller. In case of inclement weather, the ceremony will be held in Hangar 1080.

ARMED FORCES KIDS RUN

America’s Armed Forces Kids Run, set for May 18, provides military dependent children the opportunity to participate in a worldwide fun activity. Children will run three distances based on their ages. For kids ages 5 to 12. Registration deadline is May 17. For more information, call the Youth Center at 987-6355.

EFMP FIELD DAY

This event is for EFMP members and their family. It consists of multiple activities in a field day setting from 9 a.m. to noon May 18. Call 501-987-6801 for more information and registration.

CLASSIFIEDS>>5-10-13


ANNOUNCEMENTS

THE COMBAT AIRLIFTER CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT will take ads by phone from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday 982-9421, or you may mail your ad to 404 Graham Rd., Jacksonville, Ark. 72078. You may also e-mail them to combatairlifterclassifieds@arkansasleader.com Deadline to advertise in Friday's issue is 5 p.m. Tuesday.


HELP WANTED

INSURANCE AGENTS, full or part-time, great companies, unlimited income, work your own hours, great for ex-military. Call (501) 590-7705 for interview.

DRIVERS: MAKE $63,000 year more, $2,500 Driver Referral Bonus & $1,200 Orientation Completion Bonus! CDL-A OTR experience required. Call now: 1-888-993-0972.


YARD SALES

MOVING SALE, 5/11, 7 am-? 230 Windsong, Cabot.

4-FAMILY YARD sale, 5/11, 7 am-2 pm, 405 South Cypress, Beebe. Lots of glassware.

PCS YARD sale, 5/11, 6 am-10 am, 3601 Justin Ln., Jax. Whirlpool washer & dryer, 2500 psi. power washer, clothes, home decor, bbq grill.


HORSES

HORSES: LUCKY Acres Boarding Stable, TLC for your horse, box stalls and paddocks, clean pastures, indoor and outdoor arenas, riding instruction and training program. Dressage our specialty. (501) 988-2458.


PETS

2 DOGS, free to good home, shepherd/collie mix & terrier mix. (501) 650-0184 or (501) 749-6427.

AQUARIUM, 55 gallon w/stand & accessories, $150. (501) 259-1395.


AUTOS/ACCESSORIES

2001 CHRYSLER PT Cruiser, very good condition, 111,000 miles, P/W & DL, A/C, sun roof, partial leather seats, CD player, no major mechanical problems, very minor cosmetic damage, $3,500 obo. (907) 230-6430, Danny.

2010 MUSTANG Convertible, torch red, black top, V-6, 5-spd. automatic, 37,000 miles, like new condition with excellent miles per gallon & fun to drive. Price reduced to $17,500. (501) 231-6184.

2008 FORD Expedition EL, immaculate condition, loaded, serviced regularly, must see to believe, 31,156 miles, $26,000. Call/text (501) 425-2799.

ATV TIRES, Dunlop, 2 at size 25x10-12, & 2 at size 25x8-12, used but good amount of tread remains, $40 for all. (501) 843-2187.

GREAT BUY!! 2004 Grand Marquis, good mileage, clean interior, $2,850 obo. Don't miss out! (501) 241-1883 or (501) 658-3224.

2012 CHEVROLET Camaro wheels, 2-20x8, 2-20x9, only 2,400 miles, great condition, $550 obo. (501) 743-5385, leave msg.

2008 HONDA CR-V LX 4-door, black, 64,000 miles, excellent condition, $11,800. (501) 554-3508.


RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

1988 17' Traveller, 40 hp. Johnson (fully rebuilt lower unit), TM, 2 new batteries, full easy to install/remove bow fishing setup: 4 kw generator (1 yr. warranty), 500w halogens (7), many extras, $5,000 firm. (989) 413-3378.

2009 HONDA CBR600RR, 5,000 miles, clean, never dropped or laid down, lots of extras, $6,500 obo. (414) 313-9517.


ITEMS FOR SALE

LUDWIG DRUM set, 5-pc. w/hi-hat, crash/ride cymbal, orig. plus dbl. base pedals, very good condition, $350. (501) 259-8871.

COLEMAN CAMP stove & lantern, use or class as antiques, bought new in early '70s, used once, still in orig. box, use liquid fuel, like new, $75 for both. (501) 843-2187.

CRAFTSMAN, HEAVY duty shop vice, 5" jaw width, opens to 9", weight 50 lbs., USA made, excellent condition, $50 cash. (501) 843-2187.


FURNITURE

WASHER & dryer, $300 for set; electric stove, $400; couch, $100. (501) 551-1266.


HOUSES FOR RENT

GRAVEL RIDGE: newly remodeled, 3 bedroom, 2 bathrooms, in good neighborhood. Living room, kitchen/dining room, bonus room, big closets, fenced, large storage shed, garden spot. $800 month, $750 deposit. 3 miles to back gate of base. Close to schools, on bus route. (501) 615-4933,  (501) 400-4727 or (501) 681-8090.

$100 MONTH discount for military. 3 bedroom, 2 bath, approximately 1500 sq. ft., LOCATION! Playful cul-de-sac in Blooming Ridge of Cabot. Close to schools, large rooms, abundant closet space, fenced backyard. Pets extra. $1,040 month. Call (215) 264-8728.

CABOT: 2 BR, 1 BA duplex. Washer, dryer, refrigerator and stove furnished. Central heat & air. No pets, no smokers. $525 mo. Available June 1st. 849-2512.

3 BEDROOM, 2 bath, living room, den with fireplace, kitchen with stove, refrigerator & dishwasher, laundry area, 2-car garage, fenced backyard, pets considered with nonrefundable pet deposit. Close to air base, Stonewall subdivision, on cul-de-sac. $975 plus deposit. Call (501) 529-7767 or (501) 529-7624.


HOUSES FOR SALE

Brand new all brick 4 Bedroom 2 Bath, 1900 sq ft home in Base Meadows Subdivision in Jacksonville. Cul-de-sac lot backs up to 50' of wooded space with a creek! Go here for details. http://littlerock.craigslist.org/reo/3753569051.html  (501) 563-0420.

CABOT: 305 Ray St. 3 BR, 2 BA, 1,370 sq. ft., fenced yard, $85,000. (501) 425-4033.

COMMENTARY>>It takes a village

By Lt. Col. Kimberly Tooman
314 Maintenance Group deputy commander

It takes a village…

Have you thanked your caregiver today? This upcoming week, May 6 – 10, is Caregivers’/Teacher Appreciation week. This is the one week out of the year we thank the folks who spends the majority of the day taking care of our children. As a new mom of a 5-month old child who attends the Infant and Toddler Center here on base, I am constantly amazed on a day-to-day basis on the dedication of the providers who take care of my child. Working parents have challenging days, but how many of you could put up with eight or more screaming children while children’s songs repeatedly play in the background without going crazy? The caregivers who take care of my daughter have the patience of Job. I feel extremely blessed that they constantly remain vigilant to document my daughter’s progress each day. They were just as excited as I was the first time she rolled over and even captured the event onvideo for me. I also feel blessed with the qualifications of my daughter’s caregivers…not only does the Child Care Center have to live up to the Air Force Standards but they have many other OSHA, medical, and governmental standards they have to meet. In fact, they just passed their last military accreditation with flying colors!

Way to go!

So, what can you do to acknowledge everything your caregiver has done for your children and you?

First, a simple thank you goes a long way. We all get busy and dropping-off/picking-up our kids can be hectic and harried…but stop in for a few minutes this week and just say “Thank you”!

The phrase really makes the providers’ day. Next, if you so desire, a couple of gifts are nice as well… for example, if your child is old enough, the two of you can make a thank-you card or a gift in the form of a craft to say thanks.

Finally, each provider has had to fill out sheets on things they like for their own in-house Secret Santa… why not get a copy of that from the Center’s director and bring in something that they would really like… maybe a special scented candle or a gift card to their favorite restaurant. It does not have to be anything big, just something to let the providers know that you are grateful for everything they are doing to teach your young adults.

It truly does take a village to raise your child, I am just glad that the village my daughter is a part of is the Infant and Toddler Center at Little Rock Air Force Base.

COMMENTARY>>Looking back and forward

By Lt. Col. Ted Rhodes
19th Medical Support Squadron Commander

This past week, two events occurred that caused me to pause and reflect upon my time in service. First was the 31st anniversary of when I first became an Airman, and the second was conducting interviews for a new squadron superintendent, as the current superintendent will be retiring this summer after 26 years of service.

In 1982, the military was in the middle of the Cold War and Vietnam was fresh on everybody’s mind, having ended less than 10 years earlier. The current enlisted and officer appraisal system was not in place, there were no computers in the work center and e-mail was still more than 10 years in the future. In addition, there were many more Airmen in the service and many more bases that are only a footnote in history now.

When the new appraisal system was published in the late 1980’s to early 1990’s, one of the new features was mandatory official feedback during the appraisal period. This change created an environment where the senior members, both NCO and Officers, were required to provide feedback to the young Airmen. Those young Airmen in the 1980’s, are now our senior leaders who were able to grow from the experience of their senior NCOs and officers.

In 1992, I separated from active duty only to return nine-and-half years later. When I returned there was Internet and computers in every work center and e-mail had grown to the primary means of communication. Although I appreciate everything technology can do to enhance communication, getting the message out to many people very quickly; I often think people spend too much time at the computer.

Instead, they should be out walking and talking to the people who are doing the mission (mentoring). I wonder how many people are just “going through the motions” in providing critical formal feedback to Airmen, junior NCOs and officers. The formal feedback is the minimum expectation; true feedback is immediate, relevant and continuous and should occur outside the formal feedback process.

While I was working in the civilian workforce, when we needed a new staff member to assume a vacant leadership position we had the ability to advertise the job, interview and hire anybody who would fill the leadership role. If we didn’t find a qualified candidate after the first round, we continued until a candidate was hired. It’s critical for the Air Force to grow futures leaders, as we do not have the ability to hire a senior NCO or senior officer from the public sector; mentoring is the process for this to happen.

Today’s leaders must mentor Airmen to be leaders not only for today but for all the generations to come. This is what our country needs.

TOP STORY>>Spikeforce: 314 AMXS dismantles 19 Force Support in volleyball match

By Staff Sgt. Jacob Barreiro
19th Airlift Wing Public Affairs

The intramural volleyball team of the 314th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron struck down their opponents in the 19th Force Support Squadron in two consecutive matches to win the game April 29.

The 314th AMXS pounced on their competition early and never let up. Early in the first match they raced to a 9-3 lead and amassed a 14-6 advantage before a 19th FSS timeout to regroup.

Communication miscues and missed strikes set the 19th FSS back, as a lot of their volleys sailed over their opponents heads and landed out of bounds.

A brief spark after the timeout, helped the 19th FSS to cut the lead to 11-18, but they couldn’t sustain any offense and lost the first match 14-25.

After dropping the first game, the 19th FSS shook up its lineup, possibly hoping the fresh bodies could produce a better outcome. And they did come out fired up, jumping out to a 4-2lead; however, they were unable to sustain volleys and fell behind just as quickly, dropping four straight points to go down 2-6, eventually amassing a 7-20 deficit.

The 314th AMXS kept the pressure on throughout both games, casually setting up smashing spikes that swiftly landed on the gym floor, racking up points for them.

They won the second game even more handily than the first, 25-10, capturing two straight matches to take the game.

TOP STORY>>Running the extra mile

By Senior Airman Regina Agoha
19th Airlift Public Affairs

More than 250 runners took to man the street leading to Little Rock Air Force Base for The Brian Valley Memorial 5K +1 April 27.

The 4.1 mile race down Vandenberg Blvd. marked the memory of Brian, a teenager who passed away from an accidental prescription drug overdose in 2006. This year’s race collected more than $11,000 for the Ronald McDonald House Charities of Arkansas.

The Ronald McDonald House has sentimental value to Brian’s parents, Stan and Linda Valley, because of their experience staying there when Brian battled Hirschprung’s Disease as an infant.

“We lost Brian in 2006,” said Linda, coordinator of the Brian Valley Memorial 5K +1. “We decided it was time to do something in his memory. My husband and I have been doing half marathons for three years, and we just decided, ‘let’s try to put one together for him.’ We came up with the 5K +1 just to make it a little different. Most people do a 5K, which is 3.1 miles, we decided to do the plus one to make it a little different, so it’s going to be 4.1 miles. We’re also asking that people go the extra mile for the Ronald McDonald House charities of Arkansas.”

Linda said she is grateful that the Ronald McDonald House was an option for her and her family. At the time of Brian’s illness, Stan, Linda’s husband, was the only source of income. Not only was their newborn hospitalized, they also had a four-year-old son. Medical bills, hotel stays, traveling prices and the everyday necessities of a family of four were all stretched on a staff sergeant’s income. Without the Ronald McDonald House, Linda said she didn’t know what her family would have done.

“In 1988, we became connected with the Ronald McDonald House,” said Linda. “When Brian was an infant, we were stationed in Blacksburg, New York, and Brian had some health problems. The closest hospital was in Burlington, Vermont. We would have had to have taken a ferry to get there, which would cost way more than a night’s stay at the Ronald McDonald House. We ended up staying there for a month, and it truly was our home away from home. I don’t know what wewould have done without it. We were young; we didn’t have the money for hotel rooms.”

A stay at the Ronald McDonald House only cost the Valleys $10 per night back then, and that fee is still the going rate there today.

Feeling indebted to the Ronald McDonald House, the Valley family devoted time and compassion back to the House that did so much for them.

“Brian was 19 when he passed [away],” Linda said. “Once he got past all his health problems as an infant, he was a normal, typical child. He was very competitive and loved sports… a very, very compassionate, caring person. When [Brian and his brother, Aaron] were young and still lived in New York, they would volunteer at Ronald McDonald House there. Brian had been a volunteer there since he was about 10 years old. He loved it. He knows that without them his situation could have been different.”

The initial purpose for the 5K +1 was to bring awareness to the Ronald McDonald House and Brian, but it turned into a grander, more inspirational undertaking.

“At first, this was something Stan and I could both connect with, but as it’s gone on, it’s kind of turn into a little mission project,” said Linda. “We hear stories from perfect strangers. They hear our story, and I think it gives them hope that they can go on. No parent should have to bury their child. We do hope that we’re helping people realize it goes on though it’s not ever going to be the same.”

The Saturday morning event was filled with nothing but jubilance and comradely affection. Once runners crossed the finish line, they were greeted by Linda and Stan, who were accompanied by a cheering crowd of friends, family and complete strangers who just wanted to be a part of the cause.

Among the runners was a quiet, out of the spot- light, Aaron, Brian’s older brother, who stood in the back of the crowd, not drawing attention to himself at all. Aaron said he and his brother were really close, and he was glad that so many people came out to support an event with a good cause.

“It’s good to see as many people participate to help other families. I am proud of my parents for putting this together and supporting the Ronald McDonald House,” he said.

As the event ended and it was time for trophies to be handed out, Stan thanked everyone for coming and shared his appreciation with all who supported, donated or just showed up.

“All the efforts from 16 months come to this day,” he said. “I am extremely proud. I wish you all could have met Brian and hope none of you ever have to stay at the Ronald McDonald House. Here’s a big, big thank you to all for coming out. This will not be our first and only [race]. We want this to go on for years and years. This is just the beginning for the Brian Valley Memorial 5K + 1.”

For more information or to donate check out the website bvmemorial.com or email Linda Valley at bvmemorial141@gmail.com