Friday, March 17, 2017

CLASSIFIEDS >> 031717

ANNOUNCEMENTS

THE COMBAT AIRLIFTER CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT will take ads by phone from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday 982-9421, or you may mail your ad to 404 Graham Rd., Jacksonville, Ark. 72078. You may also e-mail them to combatairlifterclassifieds@arkansasleader.com Deadline to advertise in Friday’s issue is 5 p.m. Tuesday.

NEEDED: 20 young men to supplement our award winning chorus for parts in the presentation of our music. Acapella Rising, (501) 791-SING.

PHLEBOTOMY WORKSHOP ACHS Seminar, March 25th, 10 am-5 pm, NLR Community Center, 2700 Willow St. Contact Mx. Thomas, (501) 733-8107. Licensed by SBPCE/NHA.

HOMEOWNERS! There may be Money For Your Home if you need: METAL ROOFS, SIDING OR WINDOWS. The Government has set aside UP TO $25,000 PER HOUSEHOLD FOR THESE IMPROVEMENTS! Save Hundreds!!!! *Free estimate. Payments $59/Mo. No money down. 1-866-668-8681*wac. Senior and Military Discounts.**

HAIL NO! Not again! Protect your vehicles from Spring Storms! CARPORT was $887, NOW $687 through March 30 WHILE SUPPLIES LAST!  Heavy duty galvanized steel. Rated at 90 mph winds Easy to assemble Fits all passenger vehicles. Call 800-643-8728 OD Funk Manufacturing Inc., Sherwood, since ’76.**

BECOME A HOME INSPECTOR IN 30 DAYS OR LESS - Class starts soon! We offer: Home & Commercial Inspection Training, & Continuing Ed Inspection classes. For details, info: Call 501-796-3627 or email abc@tcworks.net for details or visit: www.abchii.com**


HELP WANTED:

Registered Nurse - RN NEEDED IMMEDIATELY! Central AR/LR Full time – great hours and benefits. Personal care and attendant care responsibilities for a nonprofit agency. CALL 614-7200! Apply at: www.Integrityinc.org. or send resume with references to: INTEGRITY, INC. 6124 Northmoore, • Little Rock, Ar., 72204.**

CNAs or PERSONAL CARE AIDES for Faulker, Saline & Pulaski Counties. WANT TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN SOMEONE’S LIFE? GET PAID FOR REWARDING EXPERIENCES waiting for you in the human services field working with developmentally developed disabled youth and adults. CNA exp. helpful. FT - PT HELP WANTED.  Apply online: www.Integrityinc.org. 6124 Northmoore, Little Rock, Ar 72204 ph:501-614-7200 • EOE.**

MEDICAL HELP WANTED! LPN/RN Charge Nurse - 3-11 shift and CNA’s for several shifts for a skilled nursing facility. Seeking hard working, caring, reliable team players that enjoy coming to work and caring for our residents. Long term care experience preferred. Four on, two off schedule. Shift diff. offered for 3-11 and 11-7. Check out our OUTSTANDING PAY and GREAT BENEFITS. Please apply in person at: 1320 W Braden St, Jacksonville.**

TEST ADMINISTRATORS NEEDED - to Administer state required student exams for 1st-11th graders the following dates:  April 4-6 and April18-28. AR CERTIFIED TEACHERS ONLY. Areas of need include Batesville, Benton, Conway, El Dorado, Fayetteville, Forrest City, Fort Smith, Harrison, Hope, Hot Springs, Jonesboro, Little Rock, Mena, Monticello, Mountain Home, Pine Bluff, Rogers, Russellville, Searcy. Email testing@arva.org with copy of license and/or  for more information. **

NOW HIRING CLASS A OTR DRIVERS - WEEKLY HOME TIME  GUARANTEED!$2,500 SIGN-ON BONUS.  STARTING PAY: Up to .40CPM for SOLOS, Up to .24CPM For TEAMS,  BENEFITS: Health, Dental, Vision, Life/Paid Vacation Family Owned & Operated, Searcy. CALL NOW: 800-928-4503, Apply@bowermanonline.com**

DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a driver for Steven's Transport! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! New drivers earn $800+ per week! PAID CDL TRAINING! Stevens covers all costs! 1-877-649-3153. Drive4Stevens.com**

DRIVERS!  Join Our Team! $5000 Sign on bonus. Drivers are home every weekend. Great benefits, paid holidays & miles. New equipment. Dry vans. Local family owned & operated. Must be 23 years of age and have a valid class A Commercial Drivers License. 2 years over the road experience is a must. With You for the Long Haul. ThompsonTrans.net or call (501) 228-8800.**


HORSES

HORSES: LUCKY Acres Boarding Stable, TLC for your horse, box stalls and paddocks, clean pastures, indoor and outdoor arenas, riding instruction and training program. Dressage our specialty. (501) 988-2458.


PETS

ARKY BARKY’S now open - great selection of beautiful puppies, guaranteed. Also, doing grooming & doggie supplies. 9714 Hwy. 107, Sherwood, (501) 819-6094.


HOUSES FOR RENT

CABOT/JACKSONVILLE - 4 nice homes for rent, Starting at $775-$1,050. Call (501) 985-1177.

COZY, ONE room studio apartments in Jacksonville. Bed pulls down from wall in Living Room in front of wood burning fireplace. Includes appliance filled kitchen. Starting at $325 plus utilities, deposit $200. No children or pets. Camp Construction, (501) 982-0434.

House for Lease/Purchase Perfect home in Cabot for a growing family! 2,303 sq/ft, 4 BR/3 FB, single story, walking trails to Middle and Jr. High schools. Split floor plan. Fresh carpet in all bedrooms, fresh paint throughout, and tile floors in living/kitchen areas. Large, fully fenced backyard that backs up to wooded area. All contracts will be for lease with option to purchase.  $1400/mo. Please call 980-239-0735  for more information.

LARGE 2 bedroom duplex. All kitchen appliances furnished including dishwasher & washer/dryer. Private entrance, fenced backyard, $550 month, $300 deposit, no pets. 2 1/2 miles from back gate of base, off Hwy. 107. (501) 425-7582.

LARGE 1 bedroom triplex. All kitchen appliances & washer/dryer furnished. Private entrance. Water & trash paid, $450 month, $300 deposit, no pets. 2 1/2 miles from back gate of Base, off Hwy. 107. (501) 425-7582.


HOUSES FOR SALE

309 HILL St., Jacksonville, 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath, remodeled kitchen, den/office, new windows, ceiling fans, window blinds, washer/dryer connections, carpet/vinyl floors, CH&A, double carport, approximately 1438 sq. ft., $90,000. (501) 951-5616.


MOBILE HOMES

Have a title to your Car, Boat, or Mobile home? Get a new home with any trade-in! Call 501-653-3205.**


2 Bedroom Singlewide. Priced to sell FAST call 501-653-3202.**

TOP STORY >> Rain or shine: 19th OSS Weather Flight forecasts mission success

By Airman 1st Class Kevin Sommer Giron
19th Airlift Wing Public Affairs


Dark clouds hover over the 19th Airlift Wing Base Operations building as if signaling the imminent arrival of bad weather. 

A storm system highlighted with bright green, red and yellow light up a radar monitor conveying an ominous message for the 19th Operations Support Squadron Weather Flight. 

Airmen work around the clock to collect and analyze the information as they piece together a picture of what’s to come. 

Spring is tornado season and the weather flight Airmen are on the lookout for a potential threat. 

Nearly six years ago, a twister ripped through Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas. Located in “tornado alley,” the base has a history of being impacted by severe weather conditions.

As meteorologists, Airmen monitor weather patterns 24/7 and alert aircrews and base populace of severe weather conditions imminent in the local area.

“We play a vital role in the mission,” said U.S. Air Force Capt. Ian Bergstrom, 19th OSS Weather Flight commander. “From pre-planning to execution, we brief aircrews on weather conditions and alert them if anything pops up during flight.”  

Just as the U.S. Navy uses radars and NASA uses satellites, the 19th OSS Weather Flight employs both systems to observe weather patterns hourly.

The team measures and monitors rainfall, cloud height, thunderstorms, temperatures, tornados, hail and much more to ensure the safety of the C-130 and its aircrew. 

The data collected is then used to produce five to 3-day forecasts for the 19th Airlift Wing, 314th Airlift Wing and 189th Airlift Wing. 

The forecasts are distributed using the flight’s three main functions: staff services, mission services and airfield services.  

Staff services provides base leadership with timely and accurate weather projections. Mission services briefs aircrews on local weather patterns. Airfield services provides weather watches, warnings and advisories to the base populace.

All base resources are protected from severe weather events through the weather flights three services. 

“Resource protection is our goal,” said U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Robert Cantu, 19th OSS Weather Flight technician. “Our resources are the base personnel, aircraft and property; that’s why we issue our weather warnings.”

Human input is the key element that sets the weather flight apart from ubiquitous weather applications. They maintain a 93 percent accuracy rating compared to an 84 percent rating by leading weather applications, according to the Consumer News and Business Channel. 

“The models used to collect weather data aren’t always spot on,” Cantu explained. “Human input is key to identifying issues that the models don’t pick up — we update and analyze the data consistently for better accuracy.” 

Little Rock AFB maintains a 24/7 mission readiness stance. As meteorologists, the 19th OSS Weather Flight provides trusted and accurate weather forecasts around the clock to support the global Combat Airlift mission on base. 

TOP STORY >> Different helmets: Same mission

By Airman 1st Class Codie Collins
19th Airlift Wing Public Affairs

Engines, tool boxes and water tanks; if one ceased to exist, a fire truck would not be able to successfully serve its purpose. Just as the fire truck has different tools to accomplish a task, the 19th Civil Engineer Squadron Fire Department has different elements, both military and civilian personnel – to ensure seamless operations.

The fire department has 51 personnel currently assigned – seven civilians and 44 service members. 

The 19th CES Fire Department staff is charged with protecting life, property and the environment within the boundaries of the Air Force installation, provide fire suppression forces, highly-capable rescue crews and aggressive fire prevention and education programs to protect the lives and property of the members on the installation. They are also tasked with preserving the installation’s ability to deliver unrivaled tactical airlift by responding to flightline emergencies.

“Any task, whether within the department or assigned from our leadership outside of the department, cannot be accomplished without the team effort of our military and civilian firefighters working together,” said U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Mark Johnson, 19th Civil Engineer Squadron deputy fire chief.

Responding to calls on and around Little Rock Air Force Base, the fire department responded to 646 emergencies in 2016.

“Under our mutual aid agreements with our local partners, 19th CES Fire Department can be requested to respond off base to any nature of emergency,” said James Farrell, 19th CES civilian assistant chief. “The personnel and skills we bring can be a tremendous asset to many of our partners.”

Local fire department civilians serve to provide continuity through their knowledge and experience which is learned over their years of exposure. 

“Civilians exist to impart their knowledge and experiences on their younger troops,” Farrell said. “They work side by side, teaching the military the things they have learned over many years at the same installation. Conversely, our military teaches many of our civilian’s new techniques and skills they learned at other bases, things our civilians would not have otherwise been exposed. It is a two way street. Both components of the total force contribute to the other.”

Service members work alongside civilian firefighters as one team to  accomplish missions and conduct training exercises. Though the civilians make up a small portion of the fire department, they have a large impact.

“Our civilians hold a wide range of positions from the installation fire chief down to our lead firefighters working with the operations section,” Johnson said. “Three of our civilians hold key leadership positions within the department: the assistant chief of training, the assistant chief of fire prevention and one of two assistant chief of operations. Each one is just as important as our non-commissioned officers with regard to training and mentoring our young Airmen and firefighters.”

Training exercises are conducted to ensure safety and efficiency during real-world emergency situations. By preparing for what could happen, the fire department personnel are more knowledgeable in high stress situations. In 2016 alone, the department conducted 314 training sessions, averaging out to approximately 26 monthly training sessions. 

“We would absolutely not be able to complete the mission without the partnership with civilians,” Johnson said. “Although our department has only a small number of civilians, their knowledge and experience are vital to the department. Military members are constantly moving in and out of Little Rock AFB due to moving bases or deployments. The steady state of our civilians is essential in maintaining continuity throughout the department.” 

TOP STORY >> The 19th AMDS takes home AF Medical Service awards

By Senior Airman Stephanie Serrano
19th Airlift Wing Public Affairs

Two Airmen from the 19th Aerospace Medicine Squadron at Little Rock Air Force Base recently took top honors at the Air Force level for the Air Force Medical Service awards for fiscal year 2016.

The AFMS recognizes the accomplishments of Airmen who demonstrate extraordinary expertise, leadership and commitment in the medical career fields. Hard work and dedication are core attributes of both U.S. Air Force Capt. Austin Bennett and U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Devante Scarver. 

Bennett was awarded the USAF Biomedical Specialist Category I Officer of the Year – Company Grade Category award. Bennett deployed to Afghanistan where he directed multiple teams, rebuilt programs and maintained a 4.0 grade point average in pursuit of his master’s degree. 

“I knew I had a pretty good [award] package, but I really did not expect to win at Air Force level,” said Bennett, 19th AMDS occupational health element chief. 

Scarver was awarded the USAF Public Health Airma n of the Year. This year, Scarver led and managed more than five different programs as well as volunteered and honed his professional development skills. 

“It’s a blessing because of where my career started,” said Scarver, 19th AMDS public health technician. “It wasn’t a smooth start, but to be able to just be put up for that award in itself speaks levels to me.”

These Airmen epitomize professionalism in the Air Force Medical Service and set the bar for future award recipients. 

Friday, March 10, 2017

CLASSIFIEDS >> 031017

ANNOUNCEMENTS

THE COMBAT AIRLIFTER CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT will take ads by phone from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday 982-9421, or you may mail your ad to 404 Graham Rd., Jacksonville, Ark. 72078. You may also e-mail them to combatairlifterclassifieds@arkansasleader.com Deadline to advertise in Friday’s issue is 5 p.m. Tuesday.

NEEDED: 20 young men to supplement our award winning chorus for parts in the presentation of our music. Acapella Rising, (501) 791-SING.

PHLEBOTOMY WORKSHOP ACHS Seminar, March 25th, 10 am-5 pm, NLR Community Center, 2700 Willow St. Contact Mx. Thomas, (501) 733-8107. Licensed by SBPCE/NHA.

HOMEOWNERS! There may be Money For Your Home if you need: METAL ROOFS, SIDING OR WINDOWS. The Government has set aside UP TO $25,000 PER HOUSEHOLD FOR THESE IMPROVEMENTS! Save Hundreds!!!! *Free estimate. Payments $59/Mo. No money down. 1-866-668-8681*wac. Senior and Military Discounts.**

HAIL NO! Not again! Protect your vehicles from Spring Storms! CARPORT was $887, NOW $687 through March 30 WHILE SUPPLIES LAST! Heavy duty galvanized steel. Rated at 90 mph winds Easy to assemble Fits all passenger vehicles. Call 800-643-8728 OD Funk Manufacturing Inc., Sherwood, since ’76.**

BECOME A HOME INSPECTOR IN 30 DAYS OR LESS - Class starts soon! We offer: Home & Commercial Inspection Training, & Continuing Ed Inspection classes. For details, info: Call 501-796-3627 or email abc@tcworks.net for details or visit:, www.abchii.com.**


HELP WANTED

“ARKY BARKY’S” needs caring person for puppy care and sales. PT or FT. Call Pat at (501) 944-6158.

TEST ADMINISTRATORS NEEDED - to Administer state required student exams for 1st-11th graders the following dates: April 4-6 and April18-28. AR CERTIFIED TEACHERS ONLY. Areas of need include Batesville, Benton, Conway, El Dorado, Fayetteville, Forrest City, Fort Smith, Harrison, Hope, Hot Springs, Jonesboro, Little Rock, Mena, Monticello, Mountain Home, Pine Bluff, Rogers, Russellville, Searcy. Email testing@arva.org with copy of license and/or for more information.**

MEDICAL HELP WANTED! LPN/RN Charge Nurse - 3-11 shift and CNA’s for several shifts for a skilled nursing facility.
Seeking hard working, caring, reliable team players that enjoy coming to work and caring for our residents. Long term care experience preferred. Four on, two off schedule. Shift diff. offered for 3-11 and 11-7. Check out our OUTSTANDING PAY and GREAT BENEFITS. Please apply in person at: 1320 W Braden St, Jacksonville.**

NOW HIRING CLASS A OTR DRIVERS - WEEKLY HOME TIME  GUARANTEED!$2,500 SIGN-ON BONUS.  STARTING PAY: Up to .40CPM for SOLOS, Up to .24CPM For TEAMS,  BENEFITS: Health, Dental, Vision, Life/Paid Vacation Family Owned & Operated, Searcy. CALL NOW: 800-928-4503, Apply@bowermanonline.com.**

DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a driver for Steven's Transport! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! New drivers earn $800+ per week! PAID CDL TRAINING! Stevens covers all costs! 1-877-649-3153. Drive4Stevens.com.**

DRIVERS!  Join Our Team! $5000 Sign on bonus. Drivers are home every weekend. Great benefits, paid holidays & miles. New equipment. Dry vans. Local family owned & operated. Must be 23 years of age and have a valid class A Commercial Drivers License. 2 years over the road experience is a must. With You for the Long Haul. ThompsonTrans.net or call (501) 228-8800.**


AUCTIONS:

ABSOLUTE R.E. & PERSONAL PROP. AUCTION SAT. MARCH 11, 2017 - 183 KELSO ROAD SHERWOOD,  REAL ESTATE @ 10 AM, PERSONAL PROPERTY @ 10:15 3BR/1.5BA Brick home near Little Rock Air Force Base w/WB Fireplace, Kitchen/Dining/Garage/Storage Bldg/Fenced Back Yard. Personal Property includes: Stained Glass Supplies, 10 in. Mead Quartz LX Drive Telescope w/Tripod & Much More! INFORMATION, TERMS, DETAILS & PICTURES www.RonnieGayAuctions.com or auctionzip.com ID 28438. 870-613-0387 AALB593.**


HORSES

HORSES: LUCKY Acres Boarding Stable, TLC for your horse, box stalls and paddocks, clean pastures, indoor and outdoor arenas, riding instruction and training program. Dressage our specialty. (501) 988-2458.


PETS

ARKY BARKY’S now open - great selection of beautiful puppies, guaranteed. Also, doing grooming & doggie supplies. 9714 Hwy. 107, Sherwood, (501) 819-6094.


HOUSES FOR RENT

CABOT/JACKSONVILLE - 4 nice homes for rent, Starting at $775-$1,050. Call (501) 985-1177.

COZY, ONE room studio apartments in Jacksonville. Bed pulls down from wall in Living Room in front of wood burning fireplace. Includes appliance filled kitchen. Starting at $325 plus utilities, deposit $200. No children or pets. Camp Construction, (501) 982-0434.

House for Lease/Purchase Perfect home in Cabot for a growing family! 2,303 sq/ft, 4 BR/3 FB, single story, walking trails to Middle and Jr. High schools. Split floor plan. Fresh carpet in all bedrooms, fresh paint throughout, and tile floors in living/kitchen areas. Large, fully fenced backyard that backs up to wooded area. All contracts will be for lease with option to purchase.  $1400/mo. Please call 980-239-0735  for more information.

JACKSONVILLE, NORTHLAKE, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace, fenced backyard, storage building, 2-car garage, back porch. No inside pets, $1,040 mo., $800 dep. Available now. (501) 231-6383.

LARGE 2 bedroom duplex. All kitchen appliances furnished including dishwasher & washer/dryer. Private entrance, fenced backyard, $550 month, $300 deposit, no pets. 2 1/2 miles from back gate of base, off Hwy. 107. (501) 425-7582.

LARGE 1 bedroom triplex. All kitchen appliances & washer/dryer furnished. Private entrance. Water & trash paid, $450 month, $300 deposit, no pets. 2 1/2 miles from back gate of Base, off Hwy. 107. (501) 425-7582.


HOUSES FOR SALE

309 HILL St., Jacksonville, 3 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath, remodeled kitchen, den/office, new windows, ceiling fans, window blinds, washer/dryer connections, carpet/vinyl floors, CH&A, double carport, approximately 1438 sq. ft., $90,000. (501) 951-5616.


MOBILE HOMES

Have a title to your Car, Boat, or Mobile home? Get a new home with any trade-in! Call 501-653-3205.**

New - MOBILE HOME Parts for sale: Entry doors, inside doors, skirting, bath tubs, windows, floor vents, moulding, faucets, vent hoods, roof coating, screens, showers, sinks, theft stoppers, anchors. 501-241-2032.**


2 Bedroom Singlewide. Priced to sell FAST call 501-653-3202.**

TOP STORY >> Q&A: 19th Air Force commander delivers final C-130J

By Senior Airman Harry Brexel
19th Airlift Wing Public Affairs

The largest C-130 base in the world recently marked the end of a transition that first began 13 years ago. The 314th Airlift Wing at Little Rock Air Force Base received its final, new C-130J aircraft from a Lockheed Martin facility, Feb. 27, 2017. The 19th Air Force commander delivered the C-130J; and spoke about the future of the 314th AW and its international C-130 Center of Excellence training school. The 19th Air Force executes operational-level command and control of all formal aircrew flying training missions within the Air Education and Training Command. 

1. You mention that Airpower starts in the First Command. What does that phrase mean and how does the 314th Airlift Wing play a part in it? 

The First Command is what we call AETC because our command is the first that many encounter when entering the Air Force, the first command to touch the lives of our newest Airmen. From the moment they work with recruiters, head to basic and then to tech school, our Airmen are interacting and part of the First Command, literally, their first command within the Air Force.

But beyond the literal definition, we are their gateway to the Air Force. We mold them and develop them into the Airmen they will become and we instill in them the values as well as provide them the tools and skills for success. 

Here at the 314th AW, you train and prepare Airmen for their first duty. You instill in them the values of the Air Force, the skills to be a pilot and the heart and drive of a Combat Airlifter. When they leave this unit and head into the operational force, they are well-trained, well-prepared and ready to complete their mission and provide combat airlift anywhere we ask them to go.

2. With this C-130J, the 314th AW now has its full complement of C-130Js. How will this help the 314th AW train to better prepare U.S. and coalition forces? 

Now that we have 30 C-130Js in AETC, with 14 of them in the 314th AW, the 314th AW will continue to play a large role in training and educating not only our Airmen but our coalition partners and allied nations to deliver airpower across the globe. The ability to provide interoperability between partner nations has been a key aspect to success in our missions across the world and the unique ability of the 314th to train these partners as well as our own Airmen together. With the full complement of aircraft along with the extensive simulator program, the 314th is able to train students more efficiently than ever before and will continue to produce qualified and committed Combat Airlifters.

3. Why it is so important that the Center of Excellence is co-located with operational C-130J squadrons/mission? 

By having both the training and operational arms of Combat Airlift located in one location, we are able to partner and better strengthen our capabilities to provide Combat Airlift across the world. When our Airmen training within AETC are able to look across the street or even the room and see the application of the training they are currently receiving, they are able to better understand the lessons taught and how they will apply them once they enter the operational side of things. 

The fact that the operational arm is co-located also allows our Airmen to network and find mentors within the operational units that can help tie the lessons and real world applications together. When there are examples of Combat Airlift surrounding our Airmen, their ability to connect the two aspects of Combat Airlift increases and the lightbulb goes off above their head.

4. The 314th AW operates the DoD’s largest international flying training program; how does the academic partnership with other countries strengthen operational partnerships? 

When students are able to train together and learn the functionality of the aircraft from the same source, they are better able to understand how each other thinks as well as speak in the same technical language. In addition, when students return to their home countries, they have networked and know many of the individuals they may work with in the future during coalition exercises or missions. These personal ties and partnerships allow a freer flow of communication when it really counts.

Improving these partnerships through the international training program truly does improve interoperability during exercises, and more importantly, during missions. The 314th AW enables combat airlifters from over 45 different countries to come together as a team and complete the mission efficiently and effectively not only in training but in real life as well.

5. One of AETC’s strategic vectors is “Motivational Mission Accomplishment,” what does this mean to the units and for the students who might go on to another MAJCOM after tech school? 

Although our students may leave AETC, they don’t leave behind the ideals we uphold. We not only train our Airmen, but instill within them a sense of duty, a yearning for a challenge, the understanding that each day brings new learning and that if they push themselves, they are capable of so much. These values are more than just the skill to fly the aircraft; they are the driving force behind why our Airmen continue to soar both in the sky and on the ground.

When Airmen leave AETC and head to another command, they bring with them these values and live them out each and every day. In doing so, they contribute not only to our Air Force as they challenge themselves but as they challenge those around them to strive for more and to push to accomplish the mission. Although they are no longer in AETC, they motivate and challenge those around them to take it to the next level and in doing so, improve our Air Force and our nation.

6. What advice would you give to the C-130 aircrew and maintenance students going through the programs offered by the 314th?

Don’t lose focus. Our Air Force is made great by the hardworking, dedicated individuals like yourself. This constantly and rapidly changing world demands we find innovative ways to meet our mission. We need you.

7. How will the new T-X requirements potentially change undergraduate pilot training process and ultimately the follow-on formal training units such as the 314th AW? 

There are a number of possibilities. The Air Force could stick to two aircraft training tracks, cargo and fighters, or try something entirely different. The real goal is to leverage the fourth and fifth generation technology in our newest aircraft and introduce it earlier in training.

No matter what aircraft is chosen for the T-X trainer, AETC has full confidence the 314th AW will adapt the training to produce world-class aviators who can meet our Nation’s future challenges.

8. How will you take the lessons learned here as a numbered Air Force commander and bring them to your next command? 

If you never try something new, you will never improve your unit. In my next job, I will make sure to delegate authority to wing commanders. If you have a good wing commander, let them be commanders and don’t micromanage. As Gen. Goldfein said, to revitalize a squadron you must empower commanders to take risks and let them do what they think is right. If they fail, at least they tried something new. Give guidance, have them keep you informed, but let them do their job. Most squadron commanders know what’s going on in their squadron better than a wing or numbered air force commander. 

TOP STORY >> 19th CES repairs base roads

By Airman 1st Class Kevin Sommer Giron 
19th Airlift Wing Public Affairs

Smoke rises from freshly placed asphalt on a newly paved road. A large construction vehicle cloaked in black soot sits at the end of the road signifying the job is almost done. The air is dominated by the smell of hot tar as Airmen from the 19th Civil Engineer Squadron pavement and construction equipment shop work to spread the asphalt evenly. 

Better known as the “Dirt Boyz” for their close relationship with grimy terrain and messy construction materials, they are unsung heroes working long hours in unforgiving weather to maintain the base’s airfield, roads, fences and drainage systems.  

“It’s the greatest job in the Air Force,” said U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Butch Stewart 19th CES NCO in charge of the pavement and construction equipment shop. “It’s very gratifying because everybody benefits from the work we do.” 

From the sweat of a summer’s day to the hardened cement flakes which cling to their uniforms, the Airmen work year-round excavating, pouring cement, paving asphalt, rooting trees, sweeping streets of debris and repairing barbed-wire fences which secure the base. 

While deployed, their main priority is keeping the airfield serviceable for C-130s and other aircraft to take off and provide Combat Airlift capabilities globally.

Overseas and stateside, the “Boyz” work in all environments and with a variety of construction materials that coat their clothes in a day’s work. 

“I’ve been covered in it all: mud, dirt, sand and cement.” said U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Mathew Kanakares, 19th CES pavement and construction equipment craftsman.

Their work is often labor intensive and lengthy, but morale and comradery is never lacking in their shop.

Generations of pavement and equipment operators have made the name (Dirt Boy) a term of endearment for the pride, comradery, hard work and long hours they share. 

“When I hear the term ‘Dirt Boy,’ I get a feeling of pride which flows throughout the career field because once you’re a ‘Dirt Boy,’ you’re always a ‘Dirt Boy,’” Stewart said. 

As experts in all types of heavy machinery, the 19th CES construction equipment Airmen are trained to operate everything from road graders, bulldozers and sweepers to dump trucks, excavators and front end loaders.

“I wouldn’t want to do anything else,” Stewart said. “I grew up playing with toy trucks, and now I get to play with even bigger trucks as a grown man.”  

The “Dirt Boyz” may be known for dirt and soot, but their job is essential to the overall mission and security of Little Rock AFB. They work behind the scenes to keep the base serviceable so members of Team Little Rock can continue to provide Combat Airlift across the world.